The 10,000 mile Mk1 Escort 1300 GT

Here at Revmatch I love nothing more than well-kept classic cars, particularly those with a good story behind them. You can imagine my excitement then, when a good friend of mine got in touch to share a very special car he had encountered on his travels. Something he thought was perfect for Revmatch – how right he was!

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For those who don’t know, the 1300GT was really the first of Ford’s sporting Escorts and received a punchier weber-carbureted version of the Ford Crossflow along with servo-assisted disc brakes, a close-ratio gearbox and wider wheels. Sold in two or four door form, it was good for a top speed of 94mph.

Related: Ford’s Heritage Workshop in photographs

This particular 1300GT was originally a special order car for an officer serving in the RAF. The car stayed with this gentleman during a tour of Cyprus that lasted through to 1970.

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Since then, the Escort has changed hands only twice and still resides in Cyprus, its odometer has only recently flicked over the 10,000 mile mark. Meaning that 75hp weber-carbureted version of the Ford Crossflow is barely run in!

The subtropical climate plus its owner’s insistence on keeping this car under a sheet means that this little Ford has retained much of its original Alpina Green paintwork. Previous owners have also refrained from fiddling about with the car too much; its RS alloys and Moto-Lita steering wheel although not original were period extras, for example. The interior has recently been re-trimmed (since these photographs).

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Bones claims that the car drives amazingly, and I’d not doubt that for a second. ‘This is the only one of this year/model that I know of in Cyprus and it always gets masses of attention wherever I go’ he said. When quizzed on whether or not Bones would part with the car he added ‘It could be for sale but the offer would have to be very strong’.

Huge thanks to Andrew Dodd for lining up this feature and his great photographs, and thanks too to John Bones for allowing us access to his pride and joy.